REGENERATIVE NONSURGICAL OPTIONS
Sports and Orthopedic Center is proud to provide platelet rich plasma therapy as part of its treatments for chronic and acute tendon and ligament injuries. Platelet rich plasma, or PRP, therapy uses your own body’s natural healing properties to promote healing and injuries in tissues that have been traditionally challenging to repair without surgery. PRP uses a totally different approach from traditional corticosteroid injections in that the treatment is designed to accurately introduce inflammation and highly medically directed injury into damaged tissue along with hyper concentrated plasma in order to induce the tissue to heal. In addition to the injection, the patient must undergo a specific program of physical therapy in order to achieve maximum results.

Generally speaking, patients feel significant improvement in both pain and function within 6 to 8 weeks after the treatment with continued healing as long as six months post procedure. Many professional and elite college athletes have undergone PRP therapy to rapidly heal them to be able to return to play. PRP therapy is now available for everyone from the high school athlete, to the weekend warrior, to the patient that may be a poor surgical candidate due to age or other underlying medical conditions. PRP therapy has also shown promise in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knees and other joints. Platelet rich plasma may be appropriate as a treatment for degenerative arthritis after other traditional therapies have failed and as an alternative to potential knee replacement surgery. Not all PRP therapy is the same.

PRP therapy must be done under ultrasound guidance by an experienced musculoskeletal ultrasound professional in order to achieve the best results. Sports and Orthopedic Center is one of only a handful of practices in South Florida that is expert in the use of diagnostic and interventional ultrasound for pinpoint accuracy of the site of injury and needle placement of the platelet rich plasma. Talk to the doctors at Sports and Orthopedic Center to find out if platelet rich plasma therapy is right for you.

In addition to PRP, Sports and Orthopedic Center is pleased to provide ultrasound guided prolotherapy as an additional treatment for chronic tendon and ligament injury. Prolotherapy uses concentrated mannitol as a method of introducing medically created inflammation in tissues with poor blood supply, such as tendons and ligaments, in order to promote regeneration of healthy tissue. Concentrated dextrose Is frequently used by dermatologists and plastic surgeons for such things as spider veins and varicose vein treatments. Prolotherapy is an in office procedure done with local anesthesia using ultrasound guidance. The prolotherapy protocol requires that the procedure be performed once a week for three weeks to achieve maximum healing results.

With prolotherapy, the patient will undergo diagnostic ultrasound in order to identify the areas of injury. Then, using ultrasound guidance, the physician will introduce a needle into the area injury and inject a combination of lidocaine and concentrated dexterous directly into the injury site. Because the objective is to introduce controlled injury and thus stimulate the body’s natural healing of the area, the patient should expect to undergo physical therapy for a minimum of four weeks after the procedure to achieve the best results. Not all prolotherapy is the same.

Prolotherapy must be done under ultrasound guidance by an experienced musculoskeletal ultrasound professional in order to achieve the best results. Sports and Orthopedic Center is one of only a handful of practices in South Florida that is expert in the use of diagnostic and interventional ultrasound for pinpoint accuracy of the site of injury and needle placement of the prolotherapy solution. Talk to the doctors at Sports and Orthopedic Center to find out if prolotherapy is right for you.

  • Are there any pain relief options for me that could work as well as joint replacement?
  • If I have joint replacement, how much will it relieve my pain?
  • How is the procedure done?
  • What do you do to manage the pain after the surgery?
  • What are the risks or complications of joint replacement?
  • How long will I be in the hospital, and how soon after having the procedure can I get back to normal daily activities?
  • Is joint replacement covered by my insurance?
  • After the procedure, will I see you or my regular doctor for follow-up care?
  • If I decide to have joint replacement, which company’s product do you think will be best for me? Why?
  • If I have joint replacement, will you perform my surgery? How many of these procedures have you performed?
  • What kind of activities will I be able to participate in after joint replacement?

While every orthopaedic evaluation is different, there are many commonly used tests that an orthopaedic surgeon may consider in evaluating a patient’s condition.

In general, the orthopaedic evaluation usually consists of:

    • A thorough medical history
    • A physical examination
    • X-rays
    • Additional tests, as needed

Your medical history is taken to assist the orthopaedic surgeon in evaluating your overall health and the possible causes of your joint pain. In addition, it will help your orthopaedic surgeon determine to what degree your joint pain is interfering with your ability to perform everyday activities.

What the physician sees during the physical examination — which includes examination of standing posture, gait analysis (watching how you walk), sitting down, and lying down — helps to confirm (or to rule out) the possible diagnosis. The physical exam will also enable the orthopaedic surgeon to evaluate other important aspects of your hips and knees, including:

    • Size and length
    • Strength
    • Range of motion
    • Swelling
    • Reflexes
    • Skin condition

If you are experiencing pain in your hip joint, your back may be examined because hip pain may actually be the result of problems in the lower spine.

After the physical examination, X-ray evaluation is usually the next step in making the diagnosis. The X-rays help show how much joint damage or deformity exists. An abnormal X-ray may reveal:

  • Narrowing of the joint space
  • Cysts in the bone
  • Spurs on the edge of the bone
  • Areas of bony thickening called sclerosis
  • Deformity or incorrect alignment

Occasionally, additional tests may be needed to confirm the diagnosis. Laboratory testing of your blood, urine, or joint fluid can be helpful in identifying specific types of arthritis and in ruling out certain diseases. Specialized X-rays of the back can help confirm that hip pain isn’t being caused by a back problem. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) or a bone scan may be needed to determine the condition of the bone and soft tissues of the affected joint.

In order to assist the orthopaedic surgeon in making a diagnosis, it may be helpful to write down your answers to the following questions before the appointment:

  • Where and when do I have pain?
  • How long have I had this pain?
  • Do I have any redness or swelling around my joints?
  • What daily tasks are hard to do now?
  • Did I ever hurt the joint or overuse it?
  • Does anyone in my family have similar problems, such as spurs on the edge of the bone?